• AAC is lightweight, about a fifth the weight of concrete. (It will float on water).
  • AAC can be engineered for seismic and flooding conditions and for tornado and hurricane prone areas, subjected to severe wind loads.
  • AAC is non-combustible with a UL fire rating of 4 hours for a 4 inch non-load bearing wall. Also, when exposed to fire AAC gives off no toxic gases. With the recent devastating wild fires in the South West, AAC can be an important material to consider when building in fire prone regions.
  • AAC has unique thermal properties because of its cellular structure. It combines high heat loss resistance for a masonry material with excellent thermal inertia, resulting in an overall ‘mass enhanced R-value’. AAC is renowned for its energy efficiency and gentle thermal motion in hot or cold climates, especially in areas that experience large day-night temperature swings.
  • AAC has high STC ratings and has exceptional sound absorbing characteristics. Because the material has a porous structure containing 70-80% air, it performs as an acoustic insulator to reduce sound transmission.
  • AAC is impervious to pests, termites and boring insects.
  • AAC is strong and provide better structural defense in case of storms and flooding. Because it is an inert mineral product, it will not support mold and does not rot or decay.
  • AAC provides a vapor permeable, breathable wall system.
  • AAC works a lot like wood. It can be cut, drilled, shaped and sanded with hand or power tools. Electric chases are easily sawn or routed in. One can screw and nail into it and a variety of fasteners are available to meet pull and shear requirements.
  • The manufacturing of AAC materials is a pollution free process that makes best use of a minimum amount of energy and natural resources.
  • AAC has been going green for decades and can lead the way to a more sustainable future.